ATP French Open 2014

ATP French Open 2014

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25-May-2014

09-Jun-2014

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Information about 2014 ATP French Open tennis tournament

The 2014 French Open is the second Grand Slam tournament of this tennis season and it will take place between the 25th of May and the 8th of June 2014 in Paris.  It is world’s premier clay court tennis tournament (actually the only Grand Slam still played on clay) and due to its slow playing surface and the five-set men’s singles with no tiebreak, it is also considered the most challenging tennis tournament in the world by many players. 

2014 French Open Courts

The tennis complex where the French Open is played was built in 1928 near Porte d'Auteuil in Paris. The main purpose of its construction was hosting and defending of the Davis Cup, which the French surprisingly won over the USA the year before. At the time of its construction, it was a state of the art stadium, introducing limestone/crushed red-brick combination surface of the courts, which has eliminated drainage issues related to clay surface courts.

Since 1928, the complex has been several times expanded and refurbished, and currently it consists of 20 courts, including the three main large-capacity stadiums – the Court Philippe Chartier, the Court Suzanne Lenglen and the Court 1. Besides, the complex contains a large restaurant and bar area, press and VIP area, France’s National Training Centre and a tennis museum.

French Open hlavny kurt.jpg

French Open central court - Kurt “Philippe Chartier”, http://www.tennisticketnews.com/grand-slam-tournaments/french-open

The Court Philippe Chartier (called the Central Court until 1998 when it was renamed after the long- time president of the French Tennis Federation and former player and captain of the French tennis team), built together with the complex in 1928, is the main court of the complex that also hosts the main tournament events. It has capacity of 14.840 spectators. The Court Suzanne Lenglen was added to the complex in 1994 (called simply Court A till 1997) and carries the name of a legendary women tennis player who won 31 major tennis tournaments (including 6 times Wimbledon, 6 times French Open and 2 Olympic gold medals) between 1914 and 1926. It can seat up to 10.068 fans. The last of the large courts is the circular shape Court 1 which was built in 1980 and holds up to 3800 visitors.

There is a further refurbishment and expansion of the complex planned till 2017, when lights and roof should be added to the Court Philippe Chartier, a completely new stadium with a retractable roof should (together with two smalle courts with seating for 1500 and 750) and seating capacity of 14.600 spectators is to be built and the Court 1 is to be demolished.

Schedule of the 2014 French Open

Dates

Hours
(from)

Program

Court

Sun 25 May

11am

Men's and Ladies' Singles 1st Round

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen, n°1

Mon 26 May

11am

Men's and Ladies' Singles 1st Round

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen, n°1

Tue 27 May

11am

Men's and Ladies' Singles 1st Round

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen, n°1

Wed 28 May

11am

Men's and Ladies' Singles 2nd Round

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen, n°1

Thu 29 May

11am

Men's and Ladies' Singles 2nd Round

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen, n°1

Fri 30 May

11am

Men's and Ladies' Singles 3rd Round

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen, n°1

Sat 31 May

11am

Men's and Ladies' Singles 3rd Round

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen, n°1

Sun 1er June

11am

Men's and Ladies' Singles 4th Round

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen

Mon 2 June

11am

Men's and Ladies' Singles 4th Round

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen

Tue 3 June

2pm

Men's and Ladies' Singles Quater-Finals

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen

Wed 4 June

2pm

Men's and Ladies' Singles Quater-Finals

Philippe-Chatrier, Suzanne-Lenglen

Thu 5 June

2pm

Ladies' Singles Semi-Finals
Mixed Doubles Final

Philippe-Chatrier

Fri 6 June

1pm
11am

Gentlemen's Singles Semi-Finals

Philippe-Chatrier

Sat 7 June

3pm

Ladies' Singles Final
Gentlemen's Doubles Final

Philippe-Chatrier

Sun 8 June

3pm

Ladies' Doubles Final
Gentlemen's Singles Final

Philippe-Chatrier

2014 French Open Men’s singles tournament Format and Participants

The French Open tournament is divided into five main events – Men’s singles, Ladies’ singles, Men’s doubles, Women’s doubles and Mixed doubles, four junior events (boys and girls singles and doubles), four Wheelchair players’ events (men and women singles and doubles) and three events for the tennis legends (woman, men between 35 and 45, men over 45).

In the men’s singles tournament, 128 players compete for the main tournament’s trophy – the musketeers’ Cup. 104 of them go directly into the draw based on their world ranking approx. 42 days before the beginning of the tournament, 16 players are added to the draw after passing the qualifying stage (which begins prior to the main tournament and consists of 3 rounds) and 8 players receive the benefit of a wild card. After completing the list of 128 players, a draw will determine which players will play against each other. Seeded players have a preferential position in the draw and there are 32 seeds in the main draw.

After the draw, the men’s singles tournament is divided into 4 rounds, quarter-finals, semi-finals and finals. Matches are played to the best of five sets with a tiebreak at 6 games all, except in the fifth set.

French Open price money, trophies and points

trofeje french open.jpgThere are five main trophies to be won at the French Open. The most prominent of them is the Musketeer’s Trophy awarded to the winner of the Men’s singles competition. Its current design of a traditional Roman bowl was created in 1981, it weighs approx. 14 kg, is 21 cm high and 19cm wide. The original is kept at the office of the president of the French Tennis Federation and the players receive a slightly smaller silver made replica. Its name symbolises the victories of the four famous French tennis player – the “Four Musketeers” - Jacques Brugnon, Jean Borotra, Henri Cochet and René Lacoste, who won the first Davis Cup for France. The other trophies are the the Suzan Lenglen Cup for the winner of the Ladies’ singles tournament, the Jacques Brugnon Cup for the winners of the Men’s doubles, Simonne Mathieu Cup for the winners of the Women’s doubles and the Marcel Bernard Cup for the Mixed doubles winners.

Apart from the trophies, the players also compete for price money. In 2013, over 21 mil EUR was distributed among the players, 1,5 mil EUR out of which was awarded to the winner of the Men’s singles tournament and 750.000 EUR to its finalist (the same amounts applied to Women’s singles). The price money for the 2014 season will reach 22 mil EUR. General manager of the tournament Gilbert Ysern disclosed, that the increasing trend will continue in the next years, the total price money should increase by 10 mil Eur until the year 2016. On top of that, the winner of the tournament (men’s or woman’s singles) is awarded 2000 ATP ranking points, the runner up 1200.

Brief history of the French Open

The beginning of the French Open dates back to 1891 when it was held as a national event on the courts of Stade Francais club in Paris, at the time only for men who were also members of French tennis clubs (women’s singles were added in 1897). The tournament became international in 1925, when the French Tennis Federation opened the tournament to the best foreign players. Between 1891 and 1927 it was organized in four different venues, since 1928 it has been held at the current venue.

The tournament took place every year since its foundation, apart for the period between 1914 and 1919 due to World War I and in the period 1940 and 1945 because of the World War II (only domestic tournament for French players took place in the second period and it’s not considered a part of the French Open). In 1946 and 1947, the tournament was actually organized after the Wimbledon tournament so it was the third Grand Slam of the year at the time. In 1968 the French Open became the first Grand Slam where the amateurs were allowed to play together with professionals, thus this year began the “open” era of the tournament.

The most successful men’s singles player in the history of the tournament is Max Decugis, who won the tournament eight times, however, all those victories took place before year 1925 when the tournament opened to foreign players. In its international open era, the most successful player is Rafael Nadal with 8 titles, followed by Bjorn Borg with 6 victories and Matts Wilander, Ivan Lendl and Gustavo Kuerten who each won the tournament 3 times. Regarding ladies’ singles, the most successful player in the tournament’s open era was Chris Evert with 7 titles and Steffi Graff with 6 titles, followed by Justine Henin with 4 titles. In the amateur era of the tournament, the legendary Suzanne Lenglen won the title 6 times.

Source of illustration picture: Karammba Production - Fotolia.com

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